Haunting Photographs from dawn of photography in 19th century  

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A series of chilling photographs have revealed the gruesome practice employed by the Victorians to recall their dead loved ones.

1 photo shows a mother with her dead kid leaning on her shoulder, then another reveals a family mourning his dog and another   shows a guy sat in an armchair with his hand positioned to encourage his mind and allow him to seem living.  

Photographers would attempt to make the dead subjects seem alive in the images so the photos could function as mementos to their family.

In other photos, children look forlornly at their deceased father while a grief-stricken mommy clutches on her dead baby.

A silver gelatin print showing Mrs Della Powell, who died in 1894. According to the 1880 census lived in Crockett County, Tennessee, close to the Arkansas border. Born in 1840, at the time of the census she was working on a plantation. She was unmarried, but she had six children, such as Lillie, born in 1876. Della was born in Tennessee, as were her parents

A post-mortem picture of a guy posed with his arm holding his mind, circa 1900. His eyes have been propped open at a bid to give the impression he’s still alive   

A mother is pictured here holding her deceased daughter, circa 1904. The kid has been propped up against her mother, with her eyes open into what would serve as a memento for the household

A deceased Mary Maria Stuart, circa 1885.   Photographers would try to make the dead subjects seem alive in the images so the photos could function as mementos to their family

For the Victorians the morbid photos were a source of relaxation and would generally be the only memory that they had of their late relatives.

The creation of the daguerreotype – the earliest photographic procedure – in 1839 brought portraiture into the masses.

It was much cheaper and quicker than commissioning a painted portrait and it allowed the center classes to have an affordable, cherished keepsake of their dead relatives.

Known as post-mortem photography, some of those dearly departed were photographed in their coffin.

Nevertheless, in different images, the corpses were created to seem like they were at a deep sleep or even life-like as they were put next to loved ones, placing wide-eyed.

It was an age of high infant mortality rates and children were often shown in repose on a couch, or in a crib, while adults were far more commonly posed in seats.

A picture of a deceased young man laid out in a coffin in the home, circa 1910. The creation of the daguerreotype – the earliest photographic procedure – in 1839 brought portraiture into the masses. It was much cheaper and quicker than commissioning a painted portrait and it allowed the center classes to have an affordable, treasured keepsake of their dead family members

A Carte de Visite of a grieving mother together with her deceased son, circa 1863.   In early images, a rosy tint was even added to the cheeks of corpses

Left, the body of a female is propped upright with her eyes kept right and open, a middle-aged woman from Belgium, circa 1865

A guy in a coffin at Estonia, circa 1905.   From the early 20th century, the practice fell out of fashion as photographs became more commonplace with the arrival of the snapshot

A Cabinet Card postmortem picture of a baby with its mother by England, circa 1890. In early images, a rosy tint was even added to the cheeks of corpses.

Iola Haley Newell in her coffin, Kentucky, USA, November 1901. It was an age of high infant mortality rates and children were often shown in repose on a couch, or in a crib, while adults have been more commonly posed in seats

This gloomy image on the left has been inscribed ‘Darling Little Ernest,’ a post-mortem picture from England, November 6, 1868. Right, a woman is pictured along with her baby in New York in 1875

Known as post-mortem photography, some of those dearly departed were photographed in their coffin. This specific style, often accompanied by funeral attendees, was frequent in Europe but less so in the USA. A lady is imagined here in a coffin in her home at 1905

In an age when epidemics of diphtheria, typhus and cholera claimed the lives of thousands of children and several others succumbed to states which nowadays would be treated with antibiotics, even death was trivial. Pictured, a Carte de Visite postmortem picture of a Kid from Cardiff, Wales, circa 1871

Deceased grandma Whitney, born between 1775 and 1780, is seen here in about 1856

Founded by Frenchman, Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre in 1839 Daguerreotypes became hugely popular across the globe. They were used to catch the picture of famous folks like Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S Grant and Robert E Lee. But they were soon used to help in the grieving process

A Tintype showing four women mourning their dead dog, laid to rest between these, circa 1895. The increased tint could be clearly seen in their lips

From the Start of the 20th century the daguerreotype was replaced with a simpler and more economical photographic practice and post-mortem photography gradually fell out of fashion as more families could afford to shoot portraits of their children as they climbed up

A Carte de Visite postmortem picture of a mother with her baby out of Philadelphia, USA, circa 1870. Due to the prohibitive cost, few individuals in 19th century America could afford to visit a photographic studio to shoot family portraits while they were residing. These were the only pictures they would ever need to recall their beloved children

In other photos, children flank their mother as they look forlornly at their deceased father

A Carte de Visite picture of a mother with her baby out of Philadelphia, USA, circa 1870. These images were much cheaper and quicker than commissioning a painted portrait and it allowed the center classes to have an affordable, treasured keepsake of their dead family members

An infant from Ayrshire, Scotland circa 1872.   In images both unsettling and slightly emotional, families pose with the dead infants who appear to be asleep

Posing together with her daughter that leans on her shoulder, then this Victorian mum appears gloomy as she stares into the camera. But her cheerless saying is understandable when you realise that peaceful daughter is dead. Pictured, a mommy with her deceased baby in September 12th, 1854

A shocked mother presents with her dead baby, New York, circa 1895: With Halloween just a couple of days away, this gruesome practice may seem fittingly unkind to modern audience. But for the Victorians, those photos were a source of relaxation and would often be the only memory that they had in their late Relatives

Left, a boy holding a toy and flower pictured in about 1855 and right, a child who probably lived in poverty, and circa 1920

On occasion the issue’s eyes were propped open and also the pupils were painted on the print to give the impact they were residing.

In early images, a rosy tint was even added to the cheeks of corpses.

From the early 20th century, the practice fell out of vogue as photographs became more commonplace with the introduction of the snapshot.

At a time where the average lifetime was just around forty years, it is perhaps unsurprising that the Victorians embraced the reality of the death.

The dawn of photography in the nineteenth century gave them the opportunity to immortalise the dead permanently.

An infant is put out on snowy linen, in her Very Best bonnet and dress onto a bed of flowers and blossoms in 1910

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